Monkeys for Sale

Note – (Prices subject to change)

White-mustached Tamarin
Male $6,000 Female $6,500

White-Mustached-TamarinThe white moustached tamarin or Spix’s moustached tamarin (Saguinus mystax) is a tamarin found in tropical forests in Brazil and Peru. It is black with a white moustache, white nose, and brownish back. Its diet consists mainly of fruits, tree gum and insects.

There are two subspecies of the moustached tamarin:

  • Spix’s moustached tamarin, Saguinus mystax mystax
  • White-rumped moustached tamarin, Saguinus mystax pluto

 

Cotton Top Tamarins  $3,800

Cotton-Top-TamarinThe cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) is a small New World monkey weighing less than 0.5 kg (1.1 lb). One of the smallest primates, the cotton-top tamarin is easily recognized by the long white sagittal crest extending from its forehead to its shoulders. The species is found in tropical forest edges and secondary forests in northwestern Colombia where it is arboreal and diurnal. Its diet includes insects and plant exudates and it is an important seed disperser in the tropical ecosystem.

 

The cotton-top tamarin displays a wide variety of social behaviors. In particular, groups form a clear dominance hierarchy where only dominant pairs breed. The female normally gives birth to twins and uses pheromones to prevent other females in the group from breeding. These tamarins have been extensively studied for their high level of cooperative care, as well as altruistic and spiteful behaviors. Communication between cotton-top tamarins is sophisticated and shows evidence of grammatical structure, a language feature that must be acquired.

 

It is thought that up to 40,000 cotton-top tamarins were caught and exported for use in biomedical research before 1976 when CITES gave them the highest level of protection and all international trade was banned. Now the species is at risk due to large-scale habitat destruction, as the lowland forest in northwestern Colombia where the cotton-top tamarin is found has been reduced to five percent of its previous area. It is currently classified as critically endangered and is one of the rarest primates in the world with only 6,000 individuals left in the wild.

 

Red Handed Tamarins $3,500

Red-Handed-TamarinThe red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas), also known as the golden-handed tamarin or Midas tamarin, is a New World monkey named for the contrasting reddish-orange hair on its feet and hands. It is native to wooded areas north of the Amazon River in Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, Suriname, and possibly Venezuela.[2] A population of tamarins south of the Amazon River that lack the contrasting feet and hands was previously believed to be a sub-population of red-handed tamarins but is now treated as a separate species, the black tamarin.

The red-handed tamarin’s body measures 20.5–28 centimetres (8.1–11.0 in); including the tail it measures 31–44 centimetres (12–17 in). It weighs 400–550 grams (0.88–1.21 lb). Its life expectancy is approximately 10 years in the wild and 16 years in captivity.

 

It lives in cooperative groups of 4 to 15 members with little competition within group even between breeding males. Only one female in the group will breed during breeding season with the other females suppressing the instinct. The gestation period is 140–170 days and mothers typically give birth to two offspring. Young tamarins are cared for primarily by the father and turned over to the mother only to nurse, however the entire group helps with the care of the young. Defense is a priority in a group, and when one tamarin is threatened the others will rush to its defense. The red-handed tamarin is territorial and can be aggressive, with sharp canines and claws instead of fingernails on all fingers and all but the large toe.

 

The red-handed tamarin is an exceptional climber and spends most of its time among the vines and branches of the trees. It is quick and agile and is a superb jumper known to jump distances of over 60 feet (18 m) from a tree to the ground with no sign of injury. Its diet consists of fruit, flowers, insects, frogs, spiders, lizards, and nectar.[2] Its natural predators include small cats, birds of prey, and snakes.

 

Populations of red-handed tamarins appear to be expanding into the historical range of the pied tamarin, with the red-handed tamarin gradually displacing the pied tamarin through interspecific competition.

 

Baby Penicillata Monkeys.  $3,000

Baby-Penicillata-MonkeyThe black-tufted marmoset (Callithrix penicillata), also known as Mico-estrela in Portuguese, is a species of New World monkey that lives primarily in the Neo-tropical gallery forests of the Brazilian Central Plateau. It ranges from Bahia to Paraná,[3] and as far inland as Goiás, between 14 and 25 degrees south of the equator. This marmoset typically resides in rainforests, living an arboreal life high in the trees, but below the canopy. They are only rarely spotted near the ground.


Common Marmoset $3,000

Common-MarmosetThe common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World monkey. It originally lived on the Northeastern coast of Brazil, in the states of Piaui, Paraiba, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Alagoas and Bahia.[5] Through release (both intentional and unintentional) of captive individuals, it has expanded its range since the 1920s to Southeast Brazil (its first sighting in the wild for Rio de Janeiro was in 1929) and became there an invasive species, raising concerns about genetic pollution of similar species, such as the buffy-tufted marmoset (Callithrix aurita), and predation upon bird nestlings and eggs.


Geoffery Marmoset $3,500

The white-headed marmoset (Callithrix geoffroyi), also known as the tufted-ear marmoset, Geoffroy’s marmoset, or Geoffrey’s marmoset, is a marmoset endemic to Brazil. It is known as the sagüi or sauim in Brazil.

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